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The ODID blog brings together commentary and analysis by staff, students, alumni and friends of the department on the issues we research.

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19 Sep, 2019
By Adeel Malik

A pyramid of privilege: crony capitalism in the Middle East

The Arab uprisings in 2011 were not just aimed at overthrowing authoritarian regimes but were also targeted at a well-entrenched system of economic privilege where those attached to the ruler’s insider circle had monopolized all economic opportunities.

For every regime that faced a popular backlash in the Middle East, there were some prominent businesses who became the symbol of corruption and injustice. In Egypt it was Ahmed Ezz, the steel magnate.

By
Myfanwy James
Tony Kiumbe
20 Apr, 2018

A Congolese space of aid: reflections from national staff

Myfanwy: I have recently returned from North Kivu, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where I was conducting fieldwork with the aim of understanding how humanitarian organisations have...

By
Marco J Haenssgen
17 Apr, 2018

Against the myth of ubiquity: reflections on five years of mobile phone diffusion research

If you follow tech news and research in the field of ‘information and communication technologies for development’ (ICT4D), you will sooner or later come across the idea that mobile phones are ubiquitous....

By
Diego Sánchez-Ancochea
Séverine Deneulin
03 Apr, 2018

Trickle-down does not work in social policy either: the micro side of the macro success story of inequality reduction in Latin America

It is a widely accepted fact in academia and policy circles that Latin America has experienced important gains in human development outcomes over the last decade, mainly through the creation of new non-...

By
Robin Cohen
26 Mar, 2018

Beating the Cambridge Analyticas: change the way we (s)elect our representatives

We are now all aware of how our electoral systems have been manipulated by harvesting our digital footprints and preferences. Targeted messages, images and false information are then deployed to support or...

By
Marta Favara
23 Mar, 2018

No longer children: what do Young Lives children do when they grow up?

Jobs are at the centre of the eighth goal of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) calling for the promotion of ‘sustained, inclusive and...

By
20 Mar, 2018

How might Artificial Intelligence transform corporate sustainability policies?

Rapid technological development in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has triggered a growing debate about its ethical, political and legal implications for our daily lives. In this post, I suggest...

By
15 Mar, 2018

The gendered experience of poverty

According to the recent report by...

By
Sarah Rosenberg-Jansen
12 Mar, 2018

Reflections on the Berlin conference on ‘Energy for Displaced People: A Global Plan of Action’

In January in Berlin, UN agencies, donors, NGOs and the private sector came together to ensure that the humanitarian sector contributes to the achievement of...

By
Gina Crivello
08 Mar, 2018

Thinking about care and unpaid work: family lives in the global South

Today’s observance of International Women’s Day celebrating ‘the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women’ is prompting us to blog about our thinking on gender, feminism and social...

By
Liza Benny
05 Mar, 2018

The varying burden of stunting: understanding physical growth during childhood and adolescence in Young Lives data

In 2016, more than 20% of the world’s under-5 year olds (155 million children overall) were stunted, or too short compared to healthy peers of...

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