Forced Migration Review 58 on ‘Economies: rights and access to work’ now online

Submitted by jo on Thu, 2018-06-21 13:11

When people are forced to leave their homes, they usually also leave behind their means of economic activity. In their new location, they may not be able, or permitted, to work. This has wide-ranging implications.

This issue of FMR includes 22 articles on the main feature theme as well as two ‘mini-features’, one on Refugee-led social protection and one on Humans and animals in refugee camps.

Read the issue.

Unpublish date: 
Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 13:15
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Thursday, June 21, 2018
Introduction: 

The latest issue of Forced Migration Review on ‘Economies: rights and access to work’ is now online.

Research theme: 
Migration and Refugees in a Global Context

News section:

Gideon Laux, Hannah Markay Highly Commended in Vice-Chancellor’s Social Impact Awards

Submitted by jo on Thu, 2018-06-21 12:15

The awards are presented every year to current students who show exceptional achievement and commitment to positive social change.

The judges commended Gideon (second from right), who is a student on the MSc in Economics for Development, for showing a long-term commitment to furthering social enterprises, in particular through his work with Empower Energy.

Hannah Markay (second from left), who is studying for the MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, was commended for founding a popular Dementia music project with the Oxford Hub, and has also co-founded a project called STREET in Edinburgh, which worked with the local Syrian community to design activities for teenagers.

Find out more, including the complete list of winners.

Unpublish date: 
Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 12:15
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Thursday, June 21, 2018
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Congratulations to students Gideon Laux and Hannah Markay who were both highly commended in this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Social Impact Awards.

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ODID academics at 2018 DSA conference

Submitted by jo on Thu, 2018-06-21 11:54

Emeritus Professor Frances Stewart will be speaking on ‘Changing perspectives on inequality’ as part of the first Keynote Plenary at 12:30 on Wednesday 27 June.

Gina Crivello, Paul Dornan and Ginny Morrow of Young Lives will be convening a panel titled ‘The roots of inequalities: what matters most early in the life course?’ (09:00 on Friday 29 June).

The panel will explore the lasting effects of early disadvantage, drawing on the Young Lives study into childhood poverty in Ethiopia, India (the states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana), Peru and Vietnam and other research.

Dr Crivello and Dr Morrow will also present a paper for the panel titled ‘What does youth resilience look like in everyday context of poverty? Longitudinal evidence from Young Lives’.

Departmental Lecturer Zaad Mahmood will present a paper titled ‘Decentering structural constraints: locating the site and politics of labour reforms in India’ (14:00 on Thursday 28 June).

The paper draws attention to the continuing relevance of local politics in influencing public policy, through a study of labour market reforms across Indian states and highlights the relevance of regional political economy in influencing reforms.

DPhil Giovanni Pasquali will present a paper titled ‘Measuring Governance and Upgrading across Market Trajectories: North-South vs. South-South value chains’ (11:00 on Thursday 28 June).

The paper presents a quantitative study design to measure product, process, and functional upgrading, as well as internal and external governance. This is achieved using firm-level export data over a 10-year period for the Kenyan leather and garment value chains.

The Oxford Development Studies Annual Lecture on ‘The politics of preserving gender inequality’ will be delivered by Professor Anne Marie Goetz of New York University at 16:00 on Thursday 28 June.

ODID will also have a stall in the book exhibition where you can pick up some of our publications and ask about our research. We hope to see you there.

Find out more about the conference.

Unpublish date: 
Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 11:45
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Thursday, June 21, 2018
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ODID academics will be presenting at the Development Studies Association conference, which takes place in Manchester, UK, on 27-29 June.

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BBC Radio 3 features Laura Rival describing her time living with Huaorani

Submitted by jo on Mon, 2018-06-18 15:00

In the 30-minute programme, Dr Rival’s interview is interspersed with her taped recordings from the time and set against a rich ‘soundscape’ recorded in the forest by sound designer Gareth Fry.

Dr Rival describes first hearing of the tribe, who were known as Outsiders and were a source of fear to other local peoples. She talks about her arrival in the forest with her then 9-year-old daughter and their early attempts to make a connection with the initially hostile Huoarani. She describes the difficult decision to stay on in the forest when her daughter becomes ill and returns to France.

She also talks movingly about being accepted by the Huoarani and the joyous experience of their life together, moving around the forest, where 'the hours go by so quickly and nothing happens, people are just together, fishing or hunting or getting some crops out of the plantation or telling stories'.

The programme was reviewed by Miranda Sawyer in the Guardian.

Listen to the programme.

Unpublish date: 
Monday, June 18, 2018 - 15:00
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Monday, June 18, 2018
Introduction: 

Associate Professor Laura Rival has described her experience of living with the Huaorani tribe in the Amazon rainforest in the 1980s for the BBC Radio 3 programme ‘Between the Ears’.

Research theme: 
Political Change, Conflict and the Environment

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Oxford Water Network MT seminar 3

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 2018-06-17 01:03

Location:

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Introduction: 
Event contact: 
Alastair Strickland
Event contact email: 
alastair.strickland@ouce.ox.ac.uk

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Event date: 
Thursday, November 29, 2018 -
17:00 to 18:30
OxTalks ID: 
a27b03b0-a543-47b0-8e86-5d57c0cb24cb

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Oxford Water Network MT seminar 2

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 2018-06-17 01:03

Location:

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Introduction: 
Event contact: 
Alastair Strickland
Event contact email: 
alastair.strickland@ouce.ox.ac.uk

Event series:

Event date: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018 -
17:00 to 18:30
OxTalks ID: 
41bd0a12-1d02-4c7c-9cc5-184822771aa4

Event section:

Oxford Water Network MT seminar 1

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 2018-06-17 01:03

Location:

Event type:

Introduction: 
Event contact: 
Alastair Strickland
Event contact email: 
alastair.strickland@ouce.ox.ac.uk

Event series:

Event date: 
Thursday, October 18, 2018 -
17:00 to 18:00
OxTalks ID: 
c0124dbd-2497-40cb-b2d0-1e765badc020

Event section:

Discrete Choice Experiments to Inform Programming and C-E Modelling of HIV Prevention

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 2018-06-17 01:03

Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are a survey based method for quantitatively estimating user preferences for products and/or services characteristics and are increasingly being applied in health preference research. This presentation will provide an overview of two innovative applications of DCEs to inform HIV prevention policy. The first will focus on how DCE are more recently being used to inform the design of complex public health interventions and trials, where effectiveness is highly dependent on user uptake and adherence. The second application shows how DCEs can be used to inform cost-effectiveness modelling of new technologies, where there is little data on uptake, or how the package of service in which the new technology is delivered, or indeed its own efficacy, will likely affect uptake. While examples are taken from African settings, the methodological lessons are relevant to the introduction of new prevention technologies across settings.

Biography: Fern Terris-Prestholt is an Associate Professor in the Department of Global Health and Development at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has worked on the economics of HIV prevention since 2000. She has a particular interest in incorporating consumer demand into conventionally supply-side interventions. Her projects span economic evaluations and preference studies of new prevention technologies, including rapid diagnostics for syphilis, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for and HIV self-testing. She is co-Lead of the Centre for Health Economics in London (CHiL) theme on the Economics of Preferences and Behaviour (tinyurl.com/LSHTM-CHiL ) and co-Convenor of IHEA’s Special Interest Group on Health Preference Research (tinyurl.com/IHEA-Sig-HPR).

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Event contact: 
HERC
Event contact email: 
herc@dph.ox.ac.uk
Event speaker: 
Dr Fern Terris-Prestholt (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine)
Event date: 
Wednesday, July 4, 2018 -
12:00 to 13:00
OxTalks ID: 
8f072fd2-be58-482b-9fb1-cdf741ab2964

Event section:

Event organising dept:

Contagious disruptions and complexity traps in economic development

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 2018-06-17 01:03

Poor economies not only produce less; they typically produce things that involve fewer inputs and fewer intermediate steps. Yet the supply chains of poor countries face more frequent disruptions - delivery failures, faulty parts, delays, power outages, theft, government failures - that systematically thwart the production process.

To understand how these disruptions affect economic development, we model an evolving input-output network in which disruptions spread contagiously among optimizing agents. The key finding is that a poverty trap can emerge: agents adapt to frequent disruptions by producing simpler, less valuable goods, yet disruptions persist. Growing out of poverty requires that agents invest in buffers to disruptions. These buffers rise and then fall as the economy produces more complex goods, a prediction consistent with global patterns of input inventories. Large jumps in economic complexity can backfire. This result suggests why "big push" policies can fail, and it underscores the importance of reliability and of gradual increases in technological complexity.

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Introduction: 
Event contact: 
Francois Lafond
Event contact email: 
francois.lafond@inet.ox.ac.uk
Event speaker: 
Prof Fernando Vega-Redondo (Bocconi University)
Event date: 
Thursday, June 28, 2018 -
17:00 to 18:00
OxTalks ID: 
42bd3adf-7ac0-446d-a76c-90969d0729fb

Event section:

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