Blog

The ODID blog brings together commentary and analysis by staff, students, alumni and frends of the department on the issues we research.

The views expressed in posts do not necessarily reflect the views of ODID or of the University of Oxford. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

If you would like new posts delivered straight to your inbox, please subscribe below.

Subscribe to the blog

21 Mar, 2017
By Elizabeth Rahman

Sustainable pedagogies, at home and away

If human development involves ‘taking an interest in the lives that people actually lead’, then anthropology is its privileged interlocutor. Perhaps our most distinguishing feature is our methods. Anthropologists typically spend long periods of time living with and observing the group of people they want to get to know and understand better, carrying out the same practices they do, on a day-to-day basis. We’re confident that this approach provides a fuller picture of how one aspect of life – say education – relates to another, like wellbeing or environmental sustainability.

My family and I spent over a year living with the Warekena ­– a small indigenous group who reside along the banks of the Rio Xié, in the ethnically diverse, northwestern Brazilian Amazon – as part of my research exploring how a ‘glocal’ education, grounded in the local community and rich in outdo

30 Jul, 2015

Not all child migration is trafficking and not all child work is slavery

This week, the UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, announced during his visit to South East Asia that new measures, enshrined in the Modern Slavery Act, will come in to force to curb the growth of human...
13 Jul, 2015

Seeing poverty up close

Poverty measures reported at the national level provide only a sketch of the reality poor people face. Multidimensional poverty estimations released on 22 June 2015 by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development...
23 Jun, 2015

Moving beyond movements: exploring paths of everyday citizenship in urban South Africa

In the rich literature that has emerged on social movements in post-apartheid South Africa, there have been many analyses that explore the degree to which particular social movements cooperate with the state...
05 Jun, 2015

Military madness in the Med

According to the United Nations, some 60,000 people, many of them from war-torn and poorly governed countries such as Eritrea, Somalia and Syria, have travelled across the Mediterranean Sea since the beginning...
26 May, 2015

Tough boys and docile girls? Questioning the use of corporal punishment in schools

Globally, corporal punishment is widely used in schools despite international concern about the effects on children and the implications for their capacity to benefit from school. And yet it persists....
27 Apr, 2015

Let their people drown: how EU politicians have become tragic actors in a self-inflicted migration drama

In recent months, a record number of refugees and migrants have drowned in their attempts to cross the Mediterranean Sea. According to recent UN estimates, in 2014 almost 220,000 migrants crossed the...
21 Apr, 2015

Between nation-state and ummah’s appeal: the contradictions of Islamism in contemporary India and Bangladesh

Generally, Islamists believe in the Universalist concept of Ummah (Islamic community of believers), a supranational or transnational union. The Islamists’ call for unity of the Ummah is based on the belief...

Pages