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The ODID blog brings together commentary and analysis by staff, students, alumni and frends of the department on the issues we research.

The views expressed in posts do not necessarily reflect the views of ODID or of the University of Oxford. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

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27 Apr, 2017
By Emre Eren Korkmaz

How might the Turkish referendum outcome affect Turkey’s policies towards refugees and migrants?

Turkey’s referendum on a proposed constitutional amendment that would give new powers to the president was held on 16 April. According to the unofficial results, the proposal of the governing party AKP (the Justice and Development Party) and the other right-wing party MHP (the Nationalist Action Party) was approved by 51% of voters. The outcome of this referendum stands to affect not just Turkey’s constitution, but also its policies towards refugees and migrants, both at home and abroad.

The Referendum Process

21 Mar, 2016

Digital diplomacy and the bubble effect: the NATO scenario

Measuring the impact of digital diplomacy using quantitative metrics (number of followers, retweets, shares, likes and so on) has become general practice among Ministries of Foreign Affairs (MFAs), and for...
08 Mar, 2016

International Women’s Day 2016: ‘Pledging for Parity’ needs to start with childhood

The theme of this year’s International Women’s Day campaign is ‘pledging for parity’. The ‘pledging’ part of the slogan draws attention to individual commitment and to action. ‘Parity’, on the other hand,...
03 Mar, 2016

In defence of Rhodes Must Fall and the struggle for recognition at Oxford

In 1993, Edward Said – the celebrated Palestinian literary theoretician and professor of comparative literature at Columbia University – gave the Reith lectures for the BBC. A quote from this series of talks,...
24 Feb, 2016

Rhodes Must Fall: from dignity to honour values

How many of those called racist or sexist are actually guilty of racism or sexism? Some are, but what about the others? Why is calling someone a racist or sexist different from calling them a liar or a felon?...
04 Feb, 2016

Is resistance futile? Maximising the impact of public diplomacy on social media

One of the most sought-after metrics in social network analysis is influence. Finding out who the most important users are in the network and how they leverage their influence online is of great value for...
29 Jan, 2016

‘Am I going to eat peace?’ – the politics of redistribution and recognition in women’s peace activism

Global feminism is often seen as a progressive and emancipatory movement emanating from the West and fostering radical politics elsewhere in the world. Such a view is not only ethnocentric but, critically, it...
18 Dec, 2015

The benefits of more detailed poverty maps

The lenses through which we observe the appalling situation that the poor endure now have higher resolution than in the past for several countries.
11 Dec, 2015

Migration makes the Sustainable Development Goals agenda – time to celebrate?

In September 2015, the United Nations published the final version of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
02 Dec, 2015

Religiosity and Muslim American attitudes towards political violence

To what extent does the religion of Islam condone or promote the justification of suicide bombings?
30 Nov, 2015

Will climate negotiations overcome the curse of unfulfilled expectations at COP21?

International negotiations are fundamentally nested games of expectations management. If the objectives are set too high and negotiations then fail to deliver, it would be quite difficult for the relevant...

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