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The ODID blog brings together commentary and analysis by staff, students, alumni and frends of the department on the issues we research.

The views expressed in posts do not necessarily reflect the views of ODID or of the University of Oxford. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author.

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21 Mar, 2017
By Elizabeth Rahman

Sustainable pedagogies, at home and away

If human development involves ‘taking an interest in the lives that people actually lead’, then anthropology is its privileged interlocutor. Perhaps our most distinguishing feature is our methods. Anthropologists typically spend long periods of time living with and observing the group of people they want to get to know and understand better, carrying out the same practices they do, on a day-to-day basis. We’re confident that this approach provides a fuller picture of how one aspect of life – say education – relates to another, like wellbeing or environmental sustainability.

My family and I spent over a year living with the Warekena ­– a small indigenous group who reside along the banks of the Rio Xié, in the ethnically diverse, northwestern Brazilian Amazon – as part of my research exploring how a ‘glocal’ education, grounded in the local community and rich in outdo

21 Mar, 2017

Sustainable pedagogies, at home and away

If human development involves ‘taking an interest in the lives that people actually lead’, then anthropology is its privileged interlocutor. Perhaps our most distinguishing feature is our methods....
15 Mar, 2017

'They say we don’t pay taxes': Undocumented tax-paying migrants living in the UK

‘They say we don’t pay taxes’, Yaa Mansa, a middle-aged Ghanaian woman told me when we met in London on a wet Wednesday evening in December of 2014. We met in a Congolese shop where she was working as a shop...
08 Mar, 2017

Moving beyond the gender myths in rural development

As International Women’s Day comes around, we are bombarded with claims about women’s disadvantages – in wages, ownership of land and property, access to resources – and about their contributions and potential...
08 Mar, 2017

Tracing the links between girls’ unpaid care work and women’s economic empowerment

That women’s economic empowerment and gender equality go hand in hand is being highlighted as part of this year’s International Women’s Day. The theme ‘Women in the Changing World of Work’ draws attention to...
06 Mar, 2017

Does the way wars end affect post-conflict development?

What happens when a war ends? Is it back to business as usual? Does economic growth resume? What about the distribution of incomes and the impact on human wellbeing? These are the questions we have explored in...
22 Feb, 2017

Understanding social protection in a world on the move

Donald Trump fooled us all. And although we cannot know for sure if and how he will make good on his many outlandish promises, one thing is for certain: in the US, sanctioned racism and xenophobia are reaching...
07 Feb, 2017

Examining the UN's new General Comment on the rights of adolescents

Today, the UN’s Committee on the Rights of the Child published a new General Comment on implementation of the rights of the child during adolescence at an event in Geneva.
23 Jan, 2017

Exploring 15 years of Sharia implementation in northern Nigeria

In October 1999, Zamfara in the north became the first Nigerian state to reintroduce full Sharia law and by the end of 2001, 11 other northern states had followed suit.
17 Jan, 2017

The new superpowers in the global land grab and how they operate

Much of the global south – broadly comprising the continents of Asia, Africa, and Latin America – was shaped by colonialism. The so-called “great game” and the scrambles between Britain, Portugal, Belgium,...
15 Jan, 2017

Learning tolerance from religion

Do you believe in democracy and gender equality? Even if you and I do, not everyone everywhere does.

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